Saturday, 3 June 2017 [Workshop: A Brief Introduction to DH]

9:00 to 4:00 Workshop: A Brief Introduction to DH (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)

Sunday, 4 June 2017 [DHSI Registration, Meetings, Workshops]

9:00 to 4:00 Full Day Workshops
   - An Introduction to Data for Digital Humanities Projects (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
   - Intersectionality and Surveillance (Clearihue D132, Classroom)

Early Class Meeting: 3. [Foundations] DH For Department Chairs and Deans (David Strong C114, Classroom)
Further details are available from instructors in early May to those registered in the class. Registration materials will be available in the classroom.
12:30 to 4:30 DHSI Registration (NEW LOCATION: MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
After registration, many will wander to Cadboro Bay and the pub at Smuggler's Cove OR the other direction to Shelbourne Plaza and Maude Hunter's Pub.
1:00 to 4:00 3-hour Workshops
   - DHSI Knits: History of Textiles and Technology (David Strong C108, Classroom)
   - Use Apache Spark to Explore and Process Large Datasets for Humanities Research (David Strong C114, Classroom)
   - 3D Visualization for the Humanities (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)
   - Archives for Digital Humanists (Cornett A128, Classroom)
   - Dynamic Ontologies for the Humanities (Cornett A229, Classroom)
4:30 to 6:00 DHSI Welcome BBQ
(Stay tuned for details)

Monday, 5 June 2017

Your hosts for the week are Ray Siemens and Dan Sondheim.
7:45 to 8:15 Last-minute Registration (MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
8:30 to 10:00 Welcome, Orientation, and Instructor Overview (MacLaurin A144)
10:15 to Noon
Classes in Session (click for details and locations)
  • 1. [Foundations] Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 2. [Foundations] Digitisation Fundamentals and their Application (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 3. [Foundations] DH For Department Chairs and Deans (David Strong C114, Classroom)
  • 4. [Foundations] Fundamentals of Programming/Coding for Human(s|ists) (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 5. [Foundations] Understanding The Predigital Book: Technology and Texts (McPherson Library A003, Classroom)
  • 6. Out-of-the-Box Text Analysis for the Digital Humanities (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 7. Geographical Information Systems in the Digital Humanities (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 8. CloudPowering DH Research (Clearihue D132, Classroom)
  • 9. Digital Storytelling (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
  • 10. Critical Pedagogy and Digital Praxis in the Humanities (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)
  • 11. Text Processing - Techniques & Traditions (Cornett A229, Classroom)
  • 12. 3D Modelling for the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences (MacLaurin D010, Classroom)
  • 13. RDF and Linked Open Data (MacLaurin D016, Classroom)
  • 14. Conceptualizing and Creating a Digital Edition (MacLaurin D103, Classroom)
  • 15. Visualizing Information: Where Data Meets Design (MacLaurin D107, Classroom)
  • 16. Drupal for Digital Humanities Projects (MacLaurin D109, Classroom)
  • 17. Introduction to Electronic Literature in DH: Research and Practice (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)
  • 18. Accessibility & Digital Environments (MacLaurin D101, Classroom)
  • 19. Feminist Digital Humanities: Theoretical, Social, and Material Engagements (David Strong C124, Classroom)
  • 20. XML Applications for Historical and Literary Research (David Strong C108, Classroom)
  • 21. Open Access and Open Social Scholarship (MacLaurin D114, Classroom)
  • 22. Ethical Collaboration in the Digital Humanities (Clearihue D131, Classroom)
  • 24. Digital Games as Interactive Tools for Scholarly Research, Communication and Pedagogy (MacLaurin D110, Classroom)


  • 12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference Coordination Session
    Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:10 to 5:00 Institute Panel: Perspectives on DH (or, #myDHis ...)
    (MacLaurin A144)
    Jessica Otis (Carnegie Mellon U): "DH In The Big Tent." Abstract: As a Digital Humanities specialist at Carnegie Mellon University, I experience the "Big Tent" of digital humanities on a regular basis. I support professors and students using everything from computer simulations for philosophical research to machine learning for studying old texts, while my own projects run the gamut from text encoding to network analysis to software containerization. For me, working in DH is a balancing act between pushing the borders of humanities knowledge while still maintaining a meaningful core of "what is DH?"

    David Wrisley (NYU Abu Dhabi / American U Beirut): "#myDHis messy" Abstract: As a digital medievalist working with a textual record where orthographic variance is the norm, living in environments with complex multilingual medleys, and contributing to a number of local DH cultures across countries, my DH is perpetually messy. Some infrastructure can make things easier, but I would like to speak in praise of bricolage: making do with what you have, when you have it and for as long as you have it. Whereas some might argue that confusion is the mother of error, let us consider it instead as a necessary step towards creativity.

    Meaghan Brown (Folger Shakespeare Library): "#myDHis Dusty" Abstract: As the Fellow for Data Curation at the Folger Shakespeare Library, the digital project I manage and the projects I coordinate with are deeply engaged with and indebted to our physical holdings. While Digital Humanities is often accused of being entranced with the shiny and new, I have found that descriptive bibliography and other ‘dusty’ disciplines have a great deal to offer as we create, curate, and connect digital objects. I want to ask how forms of scholarly description and organization can help us structure digital collections and think about the material implications of digital humanities work.

    Angel David Nieves (Hamilton C): "Engaging Social Justice Pedagogy and Scholarly Practices in the Digital Humanities." Abstract: An emerging critical discourse applying social justice theory and practice to digital/media scholarship is claiming growing interest. What might an intersectional framework accomplish with respect to digital humanities when an analysis with respect to race, class, gender, sexuality and difference is provided? Nieves will provide some points and reflection for further debate and discussion.

    Corina Koolen (U Amsterdam): "The Downside of Difference." Abstract: Computational methods and models generally focus on differences between data sets, even though the overlap between data sets can be large. I argue that we miss part of the truth – and might even practice a form of cherry picking – when we overlook the commonalities. My argument will take the form of an example: the ‘gap’ between female and male authors in Dutch literary award nominees.

    Jacob Heil (C of Wooster): "#myDHis edgy and therefore slow" Abstract: Hoping that you’ll forgive an admittedly fast-and-loose borrowing from graph theory, I want to wonder (with you) whether or not, in the work that we do and in our discourses of “collaboration,” we privilege the node over the edge. Do we think more about, say, expertise than we do about the natures of the relationships between experts? In these brief remarks I want to draw upon my experiences building up (and building upon) cultures of DH as a way of recentering the humanness of digital humanities.

    Michelle Schwartz (Ryerson U): "#myDHis radically inclusive" Abstract: My entry into the digital humanities came via a community archive, rather than through traditional academia, and the focus of my work thus far has been to use DH tools to recreate the feeling of that community space online. Rather than working from a specific research question, my goal has been to use DH to make radical history relevant and accessible, and to inspire in people the joy of discovery. One starting point for that mission has been to work with undergraduate, rather than graduate students, to let those students set their own path, and to use their personal journeys to guide the project.

    ... and more to come!
    5:00 to 6:00 Opening Reception (University Club)

    Tuesday, 6 June 2017

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    "Mystery" Lunches
    ETCL 'Brown Bag' Lunch Talk: Corey Davis, "Building Collaborative Models (and Relationships) for Long-Term Digital Preservation" (Hickman 105)

    Research libraries have always played an important role in the long-term preservation of society’s documentary heritage. And while maintaining large collections of print resources over time is not without its difficulties, the challenges of managing digital materials for the long-term are enormous. New methodologies for building and sustaining our cultural heritage are being developed, and this talk will explore a variety of shared services being deployed by research libraries in Canada in support of digital stewardship and preservation activities.

    Our collective cultural memory is increasingly stored in transitory bits and bytes, leading some to warn of an approaching digital dark age, where the historical record is slowly but inevitably overwritten in a thousand air-conditioned server rooms across the globe. Combine this with an environment of increasing political and environmental uncertainty, and the challenges associated with saving our cultural memory can seem daunting. So what can libraries do about it?

    This presentation will define digital preservation as a complex set of systems and organizational activities required to ensure the long-term viability of digital materials over time, and provide an update

    BIO: Corey Davis is the Digital Preservation Network Manager for the Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries (COPPUL), a consortium of 22 university libraries in Western Canada, where he works to develop the technical and policy infrastructure to support long term preservation of digital objects for all COPPUL members. He is also Systems Librarian at the University of Victoria Libraries.
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:30 DHSI Colloquium Session 1 (MacLaurin A144)
    6:00 to 8:00 DHSI Newcomer's Beer-B-Q (Grad Club)

    Wednesday, 7 June 2017

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    "Mystery" Lunches
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:30 DHSI Colloquium Session 2 (MacLaurin A144)
    6:00 to 7:00 "Half Way There!" Birds of a Feather Get-Together (Felicitas, Student Union Building)

    Thursday, 8 June 2017

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    "Mystery" Lunches

    [Instructor lunch meeting]
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:30 DHSI Colloquium Session 3 (MacLaurin A144)
    5:30 to 7:30
    DHSI Librarians Reception
    Digital Scholarship Commons, Mearns Centre for Learning /McPherson Library 3rd Floor


    About one third of DHSI attendees are librarians and archivists, or are in training for library and archival positions. This year, for the first time, the University of Victoria Libraries are pleased to welcome our colleagues to the DHSI Librarians Reception. We invite all librarians, archivists, and friends to join colleagues from across North America and the world for drinks and appetizers in our brand new Digital Scholarship Commons. This event will take place on the third floor of the Mearns Centre for Learning /McPherson Library on Thursday June 8th from 5:30-7:30 pm. RSVP here.

    7:30 to 9:30 (Groovy?) Movie Night (MacLaurin A144)

    Friday, 9 June 2017 [DHSI; SHARP Opening]

    9:00 to Noon DHSI Classes in Session
    11:00 to 1:30 SHARP Conference Registration (MacLaurin A100)
    Late registration is available at the SHARP information desk, at this same location.
    12:15 to 1:15 DHSI Lunch Reception / Course E-Exhibits (MacLaurin A100)
    1:30 to 3:30 DHSI Week 1 Farewell
    SHARP Conference Opening, Welcome

    Joint Institute Lecture (SHARP and DHSI): Julia Flanders (Northeastern U): “Cultures of Reception: Readership and Discontinuity in the History of Women's Writing.”
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: The work of textual recovery and republication for which the Women Writers Project is well known is to all appearances an effort to rediscover a textual and artifactual history: a history of books, once in circulation, now lodged invisibly in remote libraries and inaccessible to scholars and students, but brought back into the light by digital remediation. But the more significant and difficult rediscovery has to do with readership. In republishing these texts we are also seeking to reinsert them into a cultural landscape that has forgotten how to read them. And in republishing them digitally we are also reopening the question of what it means to read. Our challenge is to develop mechanisms of circulation that avoid reproducing the original conditions of invisibility and disappearance in which women's writing circulated. This presentation will examine the WWP's work on readership and reception in the context of digital technologies of reading and textual circulation.

    4:00 to 5:00 Joint Reception: SHARP and DHSI (University Club)
    DHSI Colloquium Poster/Demo Session
    SHARP Digital Demo and Poster Session

    Saturday, 10 June 2017 [SHARP Conference + Suggested Outings!]

    8:30 to 9:00 Late Registration (at the SHARP information desk) (MacLaurin A100)
    8:45 to 5:00 SHARP Conference Sessions
    5:00 to 6:00
    SHARP Lecture: Lisa Gitelman (NYU): “Emoji Dick, Prequels and Sequels.”
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: This is the second in a sequence of talks that takes a 2010 "translation" of Moby Dick into emoji as an opportunity to consider the conditions of possibility that might delimit books and literature in the contemporary moment. A massive white codex and extended work of crowd-sorcery, Emoji Dick points toward the varieties of reading and--especially--of not reading that characterize our ever more digitally mediated and data-described world. Here I proceed by locating Emoji Dick alongside a key group of precursors and successors.

    All day
    Suggested Outings
    Some ideas, for those who'd like to explore the area!
    Suggested Outing 1, Botanical Beach (self-organised; car needed)
    A self-guided visit to the wet, wild west coast tidal shelf (and historically-significant former research site) at Botanical Beach; we recommend departing early (around 8.00 am) to catch low tide for a better view of the wonderful undersea life! Consider bringing a packed lunch to nibble-on while looking at the crashing waves when there, and then have an afternoon drink enjoying the view from the deck of the Port Renfrew Hotel.

    Suggested Outing 2, Butchart Gardens (self-organised)
    A shorter journey to the resplendently beautiful Butchart Gardens and, if you like, followed by (ahem) a few minutes at the nearby Church and State Winery, in the Saanich Penninsula. About an hour there by public bus from UVic, or 30 minutes by car.

    Suggested Outing 3, Saltspring Island (self-organised; a full day, car/bus + ferry combo)
    Why not take a day to explore and celebrate the funky, laid back, Canadian gulf island lifestyle on Saltspring Island. Ferry departs regularly from the Schwartz Bay ferry terminal, which is about one hour by bus / 30 minutes by car from UVic. You may decide to stay on forever ....

    Suggested Outing 4, Paddling Victoria's Inner Harbour (self-organised)
    A shorter time, seeing Victoria's beautiful city centre from the waterways that initially inspired its foundation. A great choice is the day is sunny and warm. Canoes, kayaks, and paddle boards are readily rented from Ocean River Adventures and conveniently launched from right behind the store. Very chill.

    And more!
    Self-organised High Tea at the Empress Hotel, scooter rentals, visit to the Royal BC Museum, darts at Christies Carriage House, a hangry breakfast at a local diner, whale watching, kayaking, brew pub sampling (at Spinnaker's, Swans, Moon Under Water, and beyond!), paddle-boarding, a tour of used bookstores,and more have also been suggested!

    Sunday, 11 June 2017 [SHARP + DHSI Registration, Workshops]

    8:30 to 9:00 Late Registration (at the SHARP information desk) (MacLaurin A100)
    8:45 to 5:00 SHARP Conference Sessions
    9:00 to Noon DHSI Workshop: Race, Social Justice, and DH: Applied Theories and Methods (MacLaurin D110, Classroom)
    12.30 to 5:00 DHSI Registration (NEW LOCATION: MacLaurin A100)
    After registration, many will wander to Cadboro Bay and the pub at Smuggler's Cove OR the other direction to Shelbourne Plaza and Maude Hunter's Pub.
    1:00 to 4:00 DHSI 3-hour Workshops
       - DHSI Knits: Using Design Technology (McPherson Library 130, Classroom)
       - Intersections of DH and LGBTTIQ+ Studies (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)
       - Regular Expressions (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
       - Digital Publishing in the Humanities (David Strong C116, Classroom)
       - Steering the XPath (MacLaurin D103, Classroom)
       - Crowdsourcing as a Tool for Research and Public Engagement (Cornett A128, Classroom)
       - Web Annotation as Critical Humanities Practice (Cornett A229, Classroom)
    5:00 to 6:00
    SHARP Lecture: Robert Bringhurst: “The Mind-Book Problem.”
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: I used to hear a lot, in philosophical circles, about the mind-brain problem and its cognate, the mind-body problem. More recently, in pedagogical circles, I hear about an issue which I’ve come to call the mind-book problem. It is, briefly, the failure of so many human minds, in a hyperliterate society, to find any deep, lasting, and fruitful engagement with the book.
          All these problems (mind-brain, mind-body, and mind-book) seem to me related to one another. They are also related to something larger: the mind-world problem, familiar to philosophers and medical practitioners in all times and places. There are many who feel that the mind-world problem has reached epidemic proportions today, especially in the humanities. This may have something to do with the prevalence of the mind-book problem there as well.
          The book has been praised as the ark of civilization, the measure of the human heart, and the voice of God incarnate. It has also, of course, been damned as a form of dalliance or the invention of the Devil. More recently, it has been patronized as an archaic cultural relic in need of replacement or technological upgrading. I will not deny that upgrading is possible, and on several fronts desirable. But a book without a mind – like a mindless brain, a mindless body, or a mindless civilization – is a problem for which a technological upgrade may not be the answer. I will explore the mind-book problem from this and other angles.

    6:00 to 9:00 SHARP Banquet (University Club)

    Monday, 12 June 2017 [SHARP + DHSI]

    Your hosts for the week are Alyssa Arbuckle, Ray Siemens and Dan Sondheim.
    7:45 to 8:15 DHSI Last-minute Registration (MacLaurin A100)
    8:30 to 10:00 DHSI Welcome, Orientation, and Instructor Overview (MacLaurin A144)
    8:45 to 4:00 SHARP Conference Sessions
    10:15 to Noon
    DHSI Classes in Session (click for details and locations)
  • 25. [Foundations] Intro to Computation for Literary Criticism (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 26. [Foundations] Developing a Digital Project (With Omeka) (Cornett A229, Classroom)
  • 27. [Foundations] Models for DH at Liberal Arts Colleges (& 4 yr Institutions) (MacLaurin D109, Classroom)
  • 28. [Foundations] Introduction to Javascript and Data Visualization (Clearihue D131, Classroom)
  • 29. Wrangling Big Data for DH (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 30. Stylometry with R: Computer-Assisted Analysis of Literary Texts (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 31. Sounds and Digital Humanities (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
  • 32. Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Integration in the Curriculum (Cornett A121, Classroom)
  • 34. Creating LAMP Infrastructure for Digital Humanities Projects (MacLaurin D107, Classroom)
  • 35. Understanding Topic Modeling (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)
  • 36. Palpability and Wearable Computing (MacLaurin D016, Classroom)
  • 37. Building a Professional Identity and Skillset in the Digital Humanities (MacLaurin D101, Classroom)
  • 38. Digital Editing with TEI: Critical, Documentary and Genetic Editing (MacLaurin D114, Classroom)
  • 40. Understanding Digital Video (MacLaurin D103, Classroom)
  • 41. Beyond TEI: Metadata for Digital Humanities (David Strong C114, Classroom)
  • 42. Extracting Cultural Networks from Thematic Research Collections (Clearihue D132, Classroom)
  • 43. Digital Public Humanities (MacLaurin D010, Classroom)
  • 44. Using Fedora Commons / Islandora (Lab: Room TBA)
  • 45. Practical Software Development for Nontraditional Digital Humanities Developers (David Strong C124, Classroom)
  • 46. Documenting Born Digital Creative and Scholarly Works for Access and Preservation (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)
  • 47. An Introduction to Computational Humanities: Mining, Machine Learning and Future Challenges (MacLaurin D110, Classroom)
  • 48. Games for Digital Humanists (David Strong C108, Classroom & Lab: Room TBA)
  • 49. Introduction to XSLT for Digital Humanists (Cornett A128, Classroom)


  • 12:15 to 1:15 DHSI Lunch break / Unconference Coordination Session
    DHSI Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)
    1:30 to 4:00 DHSI Classes in Session
    4:10 to 5:00 Joint Institute Lecture (SHARP and DHSI): Brewster Kahle (Internet Archive) and Jo-Ann Roberts (CBC): "A Conversation with Brewster Kahle, moderated by Jo-Ann Roberts.”
    (MacLaurin A144)

    SHARP Conference Closing Remarks
    5:00 to 6:00 Joint Reception: SHARP and DHSI (University Club)

    Tuesday, 13 June 2017

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    "Mystery" Lunches
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:30 DHSI Colloquium Session 4 (MacLaurin A144)
    6:00 to 8:00 DHSI Newcomer's Beer-B-Q (Grad Club)

    Wednesday, 14 June 2017

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    "Mystery" Lunches
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:30 DHSI Colloquium Session 5 (MacLaurin A144)
    6:00 to 7:00 "Half Way There (yet again)!" Birds of a Feather Get-Together (Felicitas, Student Union Building)

    Thursday, 15 June 2017

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    "Mystery" Lunches

    [Instructor lunch meeting]
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:30 DHSI Colloquium Session 6 (MacLaurin A144)
    7:30 to 9:30 (Groovier?) Movie(r) Night (MacLaurin A144)

    Friday, 16 June 2017

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch Reception / Course E-Exhibits (MacLaurin A100)
    1:30 to 2:45 Awards and Bursaries Recognition

    Institute Lecture: Elena Pierazzo (U Grenoble Alpes)
    2:45 to 3:00 Closing, DHSI in Review (MacLaurin A144)

    Contact info:
    institut@uvic.ca P: 250-472-5401 F: 250-472-5681