The 2018 schedule is just about ready! A very few things to confirm, add, etc, but this is the place to be to find out what is happening when / where ...



Sunday, 3 June 2018 [DHSI Registration + Suggested Outings]

Psst: Some
Suggested
Outings
If you're here a day or two before we begin, or staying a day or two afterwards, here are a few ideas of things you might consider doing ....

Suggested Outing 1, Botanical Beach (self-organised; car needed)
A self-guided visit to the wet, wild west coast tidal shelf (and historically-significant former research site) at Botanical Beach; we recommend departing early (around 8.00 am) to catch low tide for a better view of the wonderful undersea life! Consider bringing a packed lunch to nibble-on while looking at the crashing waves when there, and then have an afternoon drink enjoying the view from the deck of the Port Renfrew Hotel.

Suggested Outing 2, Butchart Gardens (self-organised)
A shorter journey to the resplendently beautiful Butchart Gardens and, if you like, followed by (ahem) a few minutes at the nearby Church and State Winery, in the Saanich Penninsula. About an hour there by public bus from UVic, or 30 minutes by car.

Suggested Outing 3, Saltspring Island (self-organised; a full day, car/bus + ferry combo)
Why not take a day to explore and celebrate the funky, laid back, Canadian gulf island lifestyle on Saltspring Island. Ferry departs regularly from the Schwartz Bay ferry terminal, which is about one hour by bus / 30 minutes by car from UVic. You may decide to stay on forever ....

Suggested Outing 4, Paddling Victoria's Inner Harbour (self-organised)
A shorter time, seeing Victoria's beautiful city centre from the waterways that initially inspired its foundation. A great choice if the day is sunny and warm. Canoes, kayaks, and paddle boards are readily rented from Ocean River Adventures and conveniently launched from right behind the store. Very chill.

And more!
Self-organised High Tea at the Empress Hotel, scooter rentals, visit to the Royal BC Museum, darts at Christies Carriage House, a hangry breakfast at a local diner, whale watching, kayaking, brew pub sampling (at Spinnaker's, Swans, Moon Under Water, and beyond!), paddle-boarding, a tour of used bookstores, and more have also been suggested!

9:00 to 4:00
Early Class Meeting: 4. [Foundations] DH For Department Chairs and Deans (Hickman 120, Classroom)
Further details are available from instructors in mid May to those registered in the class. Registration materials will be available in the classroom.
3:00 to 5:00 DHSI Registration (MacLaurin Building, Room A100)

After registration, many will wander to Cadboro Bay and the pub at Smuggler's Cove OR the other direction to Shelbourne Plaza and Maude Hunter's Pub OR even into the city for a nice meal.

Monday, 4 June 2018

Your hosts for the week are Alyssa Arbuckle, Ray Siemens, and Dan Sondheim.
7:45 to 8:15 Last-minute Registration (MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
8:30 to 10:00
Welcome, Orientation, and Instructor Overview (MacLaurin A144)
  • Welcome to the Territory: Victor Underwood
  • Welcome to DHSI: Ray Siemens, Alyssa Arbuckle
  • Welcome from UVic: Jonathan Bengtson (University Librarian), Margaret Cameron (Associate Dean Research, Humanities)
  • 10:15 to Noon
    Classes in Session (click for details and locations)
  • 1. [Foundations] Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application (Cornett A128, Classroom)
  • 2. [Foundations] Digitisation Fundamentals and their Application (Clearihue A108, Lab)
  • 3. [Foundations] Making Choices About Your Data (MacLaurin D109, Classroom)
  • 4. [Foundations] DH For Department Chairs and Deans (Hickman 120, Classroom)
  • 5. [Foundations] Introduction to Javascript and Data Visualization (Clearihue D132, Classroom)
  • 6. [Foundations] Introduction to Computation for Literary Criticism (Clearihue A105, Lab)
  • 7. Out-of-the-Box Text Analysis for the Digital Humanities (Human and Social Development A160, Lab)
  • 9. Sounds and Digital Humanities (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
  • 10. Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Integration in the Curriculum (MacLaurin D016, Classroom)
  • 11. Text Processing - Techniques & Traditions (McPherson Library A003, Classroom)
  • 12. 3D Modelling for the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences (MacLaurin D010, Classroom)
  • 13. Conceptualising and Creating a Digital Edition (MacLaurin D103, Classroom)
  • 14. Visualizing Information: Where Data Meets Design (MacLaurin D107, Classroom)
  • 15. Introduction to Electronic Literature in DH: Research and Practice (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)
  • 16. Race, Social Justice, and DH: Applied Theories and Methods (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)
  • 17. XML Applications for Historical and Literary Research (Clearihue A103, Lab)
  • 18. Processing Humanities Multimedia (Human and Social Development A150, Lab)
  • 19. Digital Games as Tools for Scholarly Research, Communication and Pedagogy (MacLaurin D110, Classroom)
  • 20. Web APIs with Python (Human and Social Development A170, Lab)
  • 21. Ethical Data Visualization: Taming Treacherous Data (MacLaurin D101, Classroom)
  • 22. Digital Publishing in the Humanities (Clearihue D131, Classroom)
  • 23. Linked Open Data and the Semantic Web (Clearihue D130, Classroom)
  • 24. Introduction to IIIF: Sharing, Consuming, and Annotating the World’s Images (MacLaurin D114, Classroom)
  • 25. Feminist Digital Humanities: Theoretical, Social, and Material Engagements (Cornett A229, Classroom)
  • 26. The Frontend: Modern JavaScript & CSS Development (Clearihue A030, Lab)


  • 12:15 to 1:15
    Lunch break / Unconference Coordination Session (Shawna Ross and Margaret Konkol) (MacLaurin A144)
    (Grab a sandwich and come on down!)

    Discussion topics, scheduling, and room assignments from among all DHSI rooms will be handled at this meeting. See the proposal/programme/location grid linked here.

    Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:10 to 5:00 Institute Panel: Perspectives on DH (or, #myDHis ...)
    Chair: Alyssa Arbuckle (U Victoria)
    (MacLaurin A144)
    Milena Radzikowska (Mt Royal C): "Release the Kraken: Story-Driven Prototyping for the Digital Humanities." Abstract: I have spent the last 15 years of my career designing text analysis tools for use by humanities scholars. In this brief presentation, I propose to share a concept-based approach to interface design for DH.

    Emily Murphy (U Victoria): "#MyDHis Edgy." Abstract: I will build upon—or, possibly, perform a misprision of—a tweet by Polina Vinogradova; “#myDHis messy, dusty, edgy, and radically inclusive!” Vinogradova evokes the mess and dust of the archives, the edges that connect nodes of a network, and the political impetus to think of cultural history and community together. I argue that these aspects of DH have a renewed importance as we head into a moment of feminist historiography.

    Margaret Konkol (Old Dominion U): "Prototyping Mina Loy’s Alphabet with a 3D Printer." Abstract: This talk discusses the interpretive and methodological implications of using 3D printing technologies to prototype the archival diagrams of a proposed but never constructed plastic segmental alphabet letter kit––– a game designed by modernist poet Mina Loy for F.A.O Schwarz. Although intended as a toy for young children, ”The Alphabet that Builds Itself,” as a work of “object typography” articulates a theory of language as kinetic, geometric, recombinant, and open to mutation. Alphabetic segments extend into the x, y, and z coordinates in exponential iterations and conjoin with magnets. Combining elements of contemporaneous typefaces like Futura and Gil Sans, which represented modernity’s functional ideals and democratic principles of simplicity, these recombinant letters represent, as this talk argues, Loy’s unpublished modernist poem, an articulation of Loy’s concept of language as a physical fact in which substance, not just form, is semantic.

    Lee Zickel (Case Western Reserve U): "Comfortably Trepid." Abstract: #myDHis found outside the well-established, DH-friendly institutions, at an institution that is devoted predominantly to Medicine and Engineering. I, and with increasing frequency other DH practitioners and instructors, am not positioned in a DH Lab or Humanities Center, but in ITS. Part teacher, part technologist, part translator, I will briefly discuss my work supporting humanists and social scientists, particularly those who are new to or less comfortable with computational methodologies.

    Dorothy Kim (Vassar C): "#MyDHis Antifascist." Abstract: I've spent a lot of time in the last 12 months thinking about fascism, digital humanities, its long histories, and what it means to do DH work that centers social justice particularly in this global rise of late fascism. I will speak briefly about DH's history, including the medieval history related to Busa but how that history really connects to data systems that created the Holocaust and also participated in the Cold War nuclear military complex.

    Randa El Khatib (U Victoria): "Learning from the Iterative Process." Abstract: #MyDHis Iterative. In addition to the improvements that come with iterative projects, the iterative process itself is a fruitful area for scholarly inquiry. Within this iterative context, the various teams that I work with and I have been reflecting on and rethinking central DH practices, such as what it means to collaborate, prototype, remix, and implement DH values in our work. In this talk, I will present the various lessons learnt along the way.

    Sarah Melton (Boston C): "#MyDHis...People." Abstract: Taking seriously Miriam Posner’s exhortation to “commit to DH people, not DH projects,” I invite us to reflect on how people are the core of DH. In this brief talk, I will explore the intersections between DH, labor, and infrastructure.

    5:00 to 6:00 Opening Reception (University Club)
    We are grateful to Gale Cengage for its sponsorship.

    Tuesday, 5 June 2018

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference

    "Mystery" Lunches

    DHSI Lunchtime Workshop Session (click for workshop details and free registration for DHSI participants)
  • 73. Introduction to ORCID (Digital Scholarship Commons, Classroom).


  • 1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:15
    DHSI Colloquium Lightning Talk Session 1 (MacLaurin A144)
    Chair: James O'Sullivan

  • New Modes of DH and Archival Skills Acquisition in a Graduate Public History Course. Paulina Rousseau (Ryerson U)
  • Walking a Transect: Exploring a Soundscape. John Barber (Washington State U)
  • Centering the Edge Case: Designing Services for Humanities Data Research. Grace Afsari-Mamagani (New York U)
  • Orwellian Vocabulary and the 21st-Century Politics. Ilgin Kizilgunesler (U Manitoba)
  • Making Open Data from a Gray Archive. Sara Palmer (Emory U)
  • 6:00 to 8:00 DHSI Newcomer's Beer-B-Q (Felicitas, Student Union Building)

    Wednesday, 6 June 2018

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference

    "Mystery" Lunches

    Brown Bag Lecture: Alexandra Branzan Albu (U Victoria): “Visual Recognition of Symbolic and Natural Patterns” (Digital Scholarship Commons, 3rd floor, Mearns Centre for Learning / McPherson Library)
    Bring your lunch and come on up!

    Abstract: Image-based object recognition is a visual pattern recognition problem; one may characterize visual patterns as either symbolic or natural. Symbolic patterns evolved for human communication; they include but are not limited to text, forms, tables, graphics, engineering drawings etc. Symbolic patterns vary widely in terms of size, style, language, alphabet and fonts; however, literate humans can easily compensate for this variability and instantly recognize most symbolic patterns. On the other hand, natural patterns characterize images of physical structures; they often lack the intrinsic discriminability and structure of symbolic patterns, and vary widely in terms of pose, perspective, and lighting.
    This lecture will explore similarities and differences in approaches designed for recognizing visual and symbolic patterns, and will address the following questions via examples.
    - What are the distinctive characteristics of natural patterns? What dimensions of variability can we infer?
    - What are the distinctive characteristics of symbolic patterns? What dimensions of variability can we infer?

    Alexandra Branzan Albu is an Associate Professor with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and cross-listed with Computer Science. Her research interests are related to image analysis, computer vision, and visual computing. She is actively pursuing outreach activities dedicated to increasing the women's presence in electrical engineering and computer science.

    Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:15
    DHSI Colloquium Lightning Talk Session 2 (MacLaurin A144)
    Chair: James O'Sullivan

  • Defining a Taxonomy of of Abandonment for Online Digital Humanities Projects. Luis Meneses (Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, U Victoria) and Jonathan Martin (King’s College London)
  • The Stories We Tell: Representing Gay and Lesbian History through Digital Technologies in the LGLC Project. Nadine Boulay (Simon Fraser University) and Ewan Matthews (Ryerson U)
  • 6:00 to 7:00 "Half Way There!" [An Informal, Self-Organized Birds of a Feather Get-Together] (Felicitas, Student Union Building)
    Bring your DHSI nametag and enjoy your first tipple on us!

    Thursday, 7 June 2018

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    "Mystery" Lunches

    UVIC Library/ETCL lunchtime talk: “A Humanities Application of 3D printing and Machine Translation in the ChessBard and Loss Sets” by Dr. Aaron Tucker (Digital Scholarship Commons, 3rd floor, Mearns Centre for Learning / McPherson Library)
    Bring your lunch and come on up!

    Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)

    [Instructor lunch meeting]
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:15
    DHSI Colloquium Lightning Talk Session 3 (MacLaurin A144)
    Chair: James O'Sullivan

  • Documenting Deportation: A Collaborative Digital Collection. Paulina Rousseau (Ryerson U)
  • Unleashing the Power of Texts as Networks: Visualizing the Scholastic Commentaries and Texts Archive. Jeffrey Witt (Loyola U Maryland) and Drew Winget (Stanford U)
  • #haunteDH: Punching holes in the International Busa Machine Narrative. Arun Jacob (McMaster U)
  • Text in World: Computational Analysis of Trauma in Genocide Narratives. Nanditha Narayanamoorthy (U York) and Krish Perumal (U Toronto)
  • 7:30 to 9:30 (Groovy?) Movie Night (MacLaurin A144)

    Friday, 8 June 2018 [DHSI; DLFxDHSI Opening]

    9:00 to Noon DHSI Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 DHSI Lunch Reception / Course E-Exhibits (MacLaurin A100)
    1:30 to 1:50 [DHSI] Remarks, A Week in Review (MacLaurin A144)
    2:00 to 3:00
    Joint Institute Lecture (DHSI and DLFxDHSI):
    Bethany Nowviskie (CLIR DLF and U Virginia): “Reconstitute the World: Machine-reading Archives of Mass Extinction”
    Chair: Lisa Goddard (U Victoria)
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: The basic constitution of our digital collections becomes vastly more important in the face of two understandings: first, that archives of modernity are archives of the sixth great mass extinction of life on our planet; and next, that we no longer steward cultural heritage for human readers alone. In the same way that we people are shaped by what we read, hear, and see, the machine readers that follow us into and perhaps beyond the Anthropocene have begun to learn from "unsupervised" encounters with our digital libraries. What will we preserve for the living generations and artificial intelligences that will come? What do we neglect, or even choose to extinguish? And from an elegiac archive, a library of endings, can we create forward-looking, speculative collections--collections from which to deep-dream new futures? The most extra/ordinary power we possess is the power to make poetry from records of the past. Could it be called on, one day, to reconstitute the world?

    3:30 to 5:00 Joint Reception: DHSI and DLFxDHSI (University Club)
    DLFxDHSI Poster/Demo Session
    DHSI Colloquium Poster/Demo Session
  • Medlars as a Colonialist Artifact in Menzies' Journal. Paula Johanson (U Victoria)
  • Camp Edit: the Institute for the Editing of Historical Documents. Nikolaus Wasmoen (Association for Documentary Editing, U Buffalo), Jennifer Stertzer (Association for Documentary Editing, U Virginia), and Cathy Moran Hajo (Association for Documentary Editing, Ramapo C)
  • Feminist Pest Control: controlling and not controlling nonhuman pests. Lindsay Garcia (C of William and Mary)
  • Legends of the Buddhist Saints. Jonathan S. Walters (Whitman C) and Dana Johnson (Freelance Web Developer)
  • Accessibility in Digital Environments Via TEI-Encoded Uncontracted Braille. Gia Alexander (Texas A&M U)
  • PoéticaSonora: A Digital Audio Repository Prototype for Latin American Sound Art and Poetry. Aurelio Meza (Concordia U)
  • Beauty and the Book: Pre-Raphaelite Artistic Practice Contained. Josie Greenhill (U Victoria)
  • Poetic Procedures/Digital Deformances. Corey Sparks (California State U, Chico)
  • Miranda, the Folger Shakespeare Library’s new Digital Asset Platform. Meaghan Brown (Folger Shakespeare Library)
  • Living Song Project. Quinn Patrick Ankrum (U Cincinnati) and Elizabeth Avery (U Oklahoma)
  • Digital Frankenstein Variorum. Rikk Mulligan (Carnegie Mellon U), Elisa Beshero-Bondar (U Pittsburgh-Greensburg)
  • Saturday, 9 June 2018 [DLFxDHSI + DHSI Conference and Colloquium]

    8:00 to 9:00 DLFxDHSI Registration (MacLaurin A100)
    9:00 to 5:30 DLFxDHSI UnConference Sessions
    9:00 to 4:00
    DHSI All Day Workshop Session (click for workshop details and free registration for DHSI participants)
  • 53. Building Your Academic Digital Identity (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)


  • 10:00 to 5:00
    DHSI Colloquium Day Conference (MacLaurin A144)
    [10.15-10.30] Welcome

    [10.30-12.00] People: Documenting Online Lives. Chair: Yannis Rammos (Tekhnee Research and Development Center)

      - This is Just to Say I Have <X> the <Y> in your <Z>: Modernist Memes in an Era of Public Apology. Shawna Ross (Texas A&M U)
      - Youtube Yoga and Ritual on Demand: The Virtual Economics of Hindu Soteriology. Dheepa Sundaram (C Wooster)
      - The Resemblage Project: Creativity and Digital Health Humanities in Canada. Andrea Charise (U Toronto) and Stefan Krecsy (U Toronto)

    [12.00-1.15] Lunch

    [1.15-2.45] Projects: Building, Analyzing, and Mapping. Chair: Molly Nebiolo (Northeastern U)

      - Building the ARTECHNE Database: New directions in Digital Art History. Marieke Hendriksen (Utrecht U/Columbia U)
      - The Ineffective Inquisition: The Holy Office's Sphere of Influence in Early Modern New Spain. Kira Homo (Pennsylvania State U)
      - Mapping Sarah Sophia Bank’s Numismatic Collection. Erica Hayes (North Carolina State U) and Kacie Wills (U California, Riverside)

    [2.45-3.00] Break

    [3.00-4.30] Practices: Digital Scholarship on Campus and in the Classroom. Chair: Alyssa Arbuckle (U Victoria)

      - Digital Humanities in Latin American Studies: Cybercultures Initiative. Angelica Huizar (Old Dominion U)
      - Making it Seem Easy: Interdisciplinary Team Defines and Measures DH interest at SUNY Oswego. Serenity Sutherland (SUNY Oswego), Fiona Coll (SUNY Oswego), Candis Haak (SUNY Oswego), and Murat Yasar (SUNY Oswego)
      - ARL Digital Scholarship Institute. Sarah Melton (Boston C)

    [4.30-4.45] Concluding Remarks

    Sunday, 10 June 2018 [SINM + DHSI Registration, Workshops]

    9:00 to 11:00 Symposium on Indigenous New Media Registration and Breakfast (MacLaurin A100)
    Full details here
    9:00 to 5:00 DHSI Registration (MacLaurin A100)
    11:00 to 4:00
    SINM Sessions
    Full details here

  • 63. Symposium on Indigenous New Media: Reading Group (Hickman 105, Classroom)
  • 72. Symposium on Indigenous New Media: Indigitization (Hickman 120, Classroom)


  • 9:00 to 4:00
    DHSI All Day Workshop Sessions (click for workshop details and free registration for DHSI participants)
  • 53. Building Your Academic Digital Identity (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)
  • [10.00-4.00]54. An Introduction to the Archaeology of 1980s Computing (Digital Scholarship Commons, McPherson Library/Mearns Centre 3rd Floor, Classroom)


  • 9:00 to Noon
    DHSI AM Workshop Sessions (click for workshop details and free registration for DHSI participants)
  • 55. Regular Expressions (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
  • 56. 3D Visualization for the Humanities (MacLaurin D010, Classroom)
  • 58. DH Fieldwork Methods (MacLaurin D016, Classroom)
  • 60. Pedagogy of the Digitally Oppressed: Inculcating De-/Anti-/Post-Colonial Digital Humanities (MacLaurin D107, Classroom)
  • 61. Introduction to #GraphPoem. Digital Tools for Poetry Computational Analysis and Graph Theory Apps in Poetry (MacLaurin D101, Classroom)
  • 62. Creating a CV for Digital Humanities Makers (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)


  • 1:00 to 4:00
    DHSI PM Workshop Sessions (click for workshop details and free registration for DHSI participants)
  • 64. Agent-Based Modelling in the Humanities (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
  • 65. Unleash Linux on MacOS (MacLaurin D010, Classroom)
  • 66. DHSI Knits: History of Textiles and Technology (Fine Arts 109, Classroom)
  • 67. Crowdsourcing as a Tool for Research and Public Engagement (MacLaurin D109, Classroom)
  • 69. Web Annotation as Critical Humanities Practice (MacLaurin D016, Classroom)
  • 70. Dynamic Ontologies for the Humanities (MacLaurin D107, Classroom)
  • 71. Social Media Research in the Humanities (MacLaurin D101, Classroom)


  • 4:10 to 5:00
    Joint Institute Lecture (DHSI and SINM):
    David Gaertner (U British Columbia): “A Landless Territory?: CyberPowWow and the Politics of Indigenous New Media.”
    Chair: Deanna Reder (Simon Fraser U)
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: Following the 1997 launch of Skawennati's (Mohawk) CyberPowWow, digital space has become a vital new territory for the resurgence of Indigenous storytelling and cultural practice: "We have signed a new treaty," Cree artist Archer Pechawis wrote of this period, "and it is good. We have the right to hunt, fish, dance and make art at www.CyberPowWow.net, .org and .com for as long as the grass grows and the rivers flow." This talk will critically explore the theoretical, cultural, political-economic, and gendered dynamics underwriting the histories and futures of Indigenous new media. Particular attention will be given in examining the ways in which new media and digital storytelling connect to and support key issues in the field of Indigenous studies, such as sovereignty, self-determination, decolonization, and land rights.

    After the day, many will wander to Cadboro Bay and the pub at Smuggler's Cove OR the other direction to Shelbourne Plaza and Maude Hunter's Pub OR even into the city for a bite to eat.

    Monday, 11 June 2018 [DHSI + SINM]

    Your hosts for the week are Ray Siemens and Dan Sondheim.
    7:45 to 8:15 DHSI Last-minute Registration (MacLaurin A100)
    8:30 to 10:00
    Welcome, Orientation, and Instructor Overview (MacLaurin A144)
  • Welcome to DHSI: Ray Siemens
  • 8:45 to 4:00 SINM Sessions
    Full details here
    10:15 to Noon
    DHSI Classes in Session (click for details and locations)
  • 27. [Foundations] Understanding The Predigital Book: Technology and Texts (McPherson Library A003, Classroom)
  • 28. [Foundations] Developing a Digital Project (With Omeka) (Clearihue D132, Classroom)
  • 29. [Foundations] Models for DH at Liberal Arts Colleges (& 4 yr Institutions) (MacLaurin D109, Classroom)
  • 30. [Foundations] Fundamentals of Programming/Coding for Human(s|ists) (Clearihue A108, Lab)
  • 31. [Foundations] Music Encoding Fundamentals and their Applications (Clearihue A030, Lab)
  • 32. Stylometry with R: Computer-Assisted Analysis of Literary Texts (Clearihue A102, Lab)
  • 33. Digital Storytelling (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
  • 34. Text Mapping as Modelling (Clearihue D131, Classroom)
  • 35. Geographical Information Systems in the Digital Humanities (Clearihue A105, Lab)
  • 36. Open Access and Open Social Scholarship (MacLaurin D114, Classroom)
  • 37. Introduction to Machine Learning in the Digital Humanities (Cornett A229, Classroom)
  • 38. Queer Digital Humanities: Intersections, Interrogations, Iterations (MacLaurin D110, Classroom)
  • 41. Using Fedora Commons / Islandora (Human and Social Development A160, Lab)
  • 42. Documenting Born Digital Creative and Scholarly Works for Access and Preservation (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)
  • 43. Games for Digital Humanists (MacLaurin D016, Classroom & Human and Social Development A170, Lab)
  • 44. XPath for Document Archeology and Project Management (Cornett A128, Classroom)
  • 46. Surveillance and the Digital Humanities (MacLaurin D103, Classroom)
  • 47. Text Analysis with Python and the Natural Language ToolKit (Clearihue A103, Lab)
  • 48. Information Security for Digital Researchers (Clearihue D130, Classroom)
  • 49. Wrangling Big Data for DH (Human and Social Development A150, Lab)
  • 50. Accessibility & Digital Environments (MacLaurin D101, Classroom)
  • 51. Critical Pedagogy and Digital Praxis in the Humanities (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)
  • 52. Drupal for Digital Humanities Projects (MacLaurin D107, Classroom)


  • 12:15 to 1:15
    Lunch break / Unconference Coordination Session (Chelcie Rowell and Alix Keener) (MacLaurin A144)
    (Grab a sandwich and come on down!)

    Discussion topics, scheduling, and room assignments from among all DHSI rooms will be handled at this meeting. See the proposal/programme/location grid linked here.

    DHSI Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)
    1:30 to 4:00 DHSI Classes in Session
    4:10 to 5:00
    Joint Institute Lecture (DHSI and SINM):
    Jordan Abel (Simon Fraser U): "Indigeneity, Conceptualism, and the Borders of DH.”
    Chair: Michelle Brown (U Hawaii)
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: This talk brings together digital humanities discourses in computational textual analysis and Indigenous Literary Studies to analyze a corpus comprised of every book of Indigenous poetry published in Canada, extending from Pauline Johnson's 1895 book The White Wampum to Marilyn Dumont's 2015 book The Pemmican Eaters. While the main goal of this research project initially centered on the topic modeling of a corpus of Indigenous poetry, the project also addresses the systemic barriers that have prevented such work gaining traction, and likewise attempts to address the specific challenges that Indigenous writing (and in particular Indigenous poetry) present to current Digital Humanities methodologies.

    5:00 to 6:00 Joint Reception: DHSI and SINM (University Club)

    Tuesday, 12 June 2018

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference

    "Mystery" Lunches

    DHSI Lunchtime Workshop Session (click for workshop details and free registration for DHSI participants)
  • 73. Introduction to ORCID (Digital Scholarship Commons, Classroom).


  • 1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:15
    DHSI Colloquium Lightning Talk Session 4 (MacLaurin A144)
    Chair: Lindsey Seatter

  • Mapping Indigenous and Chicana/o Environmental Imaginaries using GIS. Stevie Ruiz (California State U, Northridge), Quetzalli Enrique (California State U, Northridge), Enrique Ramirez (California State U, Northridge), and Tomas Figueroa (California State U, Northridge)
  • Doing DH with Graphic Narratives. John Barber (Washington State U)
  • “But is it any good?”: A quantitative approach to the popularity of digital fanfiction. Suzanne Black (U Edinburgh)
  • The American Prison Writing Archive (APWA). Doran Larson (Hamilton C), Janet Simons (Digital Humanities Initiative, Hamilton C), and William Rasenberger (Hamilton C)
  • 6:00 to 8:00 DHSI Newcomer's Beer-B-Q (Felicitas, Student Union Building)

    Wednesday, 13 June 2018

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference

    "Mystery" Lunches

    Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:15
    DHSI Colloquium Lightning Talk Session 5 (MacLaurin A144)
    Chair: Lindsey Seatter

  • Faraway, so close: Has the political environment really changed in Ecuador?. Luis Meneses (Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, U Victoria)
  • Re-mixing Melville's Reading: Text Analysis of Marginalia with R and XSLT. Christopher Ohge (U London, School of Advanced Study) and Steven Olsen-Smith (Boise State U)
  • Developing Interactive and Open-Source OER: Inquiry-Based Music Theory. Evan Williamson (U Idaho)
  • Spatial Humanities and the Web of Everywhere. Ken Cooper (SUNY Geneseo)
  • 6:00 to 7:00 "Half Way There (yet again)!" [An Informal, Self-Organized Birds of a Feather Get-Together] (Felicitas, Student Union Building)
    Bring your DHSI nametag and enjoy your first tipple on us!

    Thursday, 14 June 2018

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference

    "Mystery" Lunches

    Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)

    [Instructor lunch meeting]
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:15
    DHSI Colloquium Lightning Talk Session 6 (MacLaurin A144)
    Chair: Lindsey Seatter

  • Composition not Inheritance: Imagining a Functional Digital Humanities. Andrew Pilsch (Texas A&M U)
  • Plotting Our Trajectories: Navigating, Situating, and Re-Inventing Research Topoi with R. Sean McCullough (Texas Christian University) and Jongkeyong Kim (Texas Christian U)
  • Herb Simon and His Books. Avery Wiscomb (Carnegie Mellon U) and Daniel Evans (Carnegie Mellon U)
  • (De/Re)Defining “The Digital”: A Decolonial Approach to Digital Humanities. Ashley Caranto Morford (U Toronto) and Arun Jacob (McMaster U)
  • 7:30 to 9:30 (Groovier?) Movie(r) Night (MacLaurin A144)

    Friday, 15 June 2018

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch Reception / Course E-Exhibits (MacLaurin A100)
    1:30 to 2:30
    Institute Lecture: William Bowen (U Toronto Scarborough): “Discovery, Collaboration and Dissemination: Lessons Learned and Plans for the Future”
    Chair: Alix Shield (Simon Fraser U)
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: Much has changed and continues to change in digital humanities since the formal establishment of Iter in the Fall of 1997. However, the mandate of the not-for-profit partnership to support "the advancement of learning in the study and teaching of Middle Ages and Renaissance (400--1700) through the development and distribution of online resources" continues to have relevance. This presentation explores the striking challenges faced by Iter and presents our current thinking on the realization of this mandate for the future through a platform with a focus on facilitating the discovery of the academic resources necessary to our work; creating an environment for collaboration, sharing and developing projects; and on enabling the distribution and publication of our scholarship.

    2:40 to 3:00 Awards and Bursaries Recognition
    Closing, DHSI in Review (MacLaurin A144)

    Contact info:
    institut@uvic.ca P: 250-472-5401 F: 250-472-5681