Sunday, 5 June 2016 [DHSI Registration, Meetings, Workshops]

9:00 to 4:00
Early Class Meeting: 3. [Foundations] DH For Department Chairs and Deans (David Strong C114, Classroom)
Further details are available from instructors. Registration materials will be available in the classroom.
12:30 to 5:00 DHSI Registration (NEW LOCATION: MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
After registration, many will wander to Cadboro Bay and the pub at Smuggler's Cove OR the other direction to Shelbourne Plaza and Maude Hunter's Pub.
1:00 to 4:00 3-hour Workshops
- 45. 3D Visualization for the Humanities [5 June] (MacLaurin D107, Classroom)
- 46. Beyond TEI: Metadata for Digital Humanities [5 June] (MacLaurin D109, Classroom)
4:00 to 5:00 Workshop:
- 44. Twitter Basics: An Introduction to Social Media [5 June] (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)

Monday, 6 June 2016

Your hosts for the week are Ray Siemens and Dan Sondheim.
7:45 to 8:15 Last-minute Registration (MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
8:30 to 10:00
Welcome, Orientation, and Instructor Overview (MacLaurin A144)
  • Welcome to DHSI: Ray Siemens
  • Welcome from UVic: Iain Higgins (Chair, English), Margaret Cameron (Associate Dean Research, Humanities), Jonathan Bengtson (University Librarian)
  • 10:15 to Noon
    Classes in Session (click for details and locations)
  • 1. [Foundations] Text Encoding Fundamentals and their Application (Clearihue A102, Lab)
  • 2. [Foundations] Digitisation Fundamentals and their Application (Clearihue A051, Lab)
  • 3. [Foundations] DH For Department Chairs and Deans (David Strong C114, Classroom)
  • 4. [Foundations] Fundamentals of Programming/Coding for Human(s|ists) Clearihue A103, Lab)
  • 5. [Foundations] Understanding The Predigital Book: Technology and Texts (McPherson Library A003, Classroom)
  • 6. Out-of-the-Box Text Analysis for the Digital Humanities (Human and Social Development A160, Lab)
  • 7. Geographical Information Systems in the Digital Humanities(Human and Social Development A170, Lab)
  • 8. CloudPowering DH Research (David Strong C108, Classroom)
  • 9. Digital Storytelling (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
  • 11. Digital Humanities Pedagogy: Integration in the Curriculum (Cornett A121, Classroom)
  • 13. Text Processing - Techniques & Traditions (Cornett A229, Classroom)
  • 14. Issues in Large Project Planning and Management (Hickman 120, Classroom)
  • 15. 3D Modelling for the Digital Humanities and Social Sciences (MacLaurin D010, Classroom)
  • 16. Digital Humanities Databases (Clearihue D132, Classroom)
  • 17. Creating LAMP Infrastructure for Digital Humanities Projects (Human and Social Development A270, Classroom)
  • 18. RDF and Linked Open Data (Human and Social Development A264, Classroom)
  • 19. Palpability and Wearable Computing (MacLaurin D016, Classroom)
  • 20. Drupal for Digital Humanities Projects (MacLaurin D109, Classroom)
  • 21. Introduction to Electronic Literature in DH: Research and Practice (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)


  • 12:15 to 1:15
    Lunch break / Unconference Coordination Session (MacLaurin A144)
    (Grab a sandwich and come on down!)

    Unconference discussions through DHSI are coordinated by Paige Morgan, Yvonne Lam, and Randa El Khatib; discussion topics, scheduling, and room assignments from among all DHSI rooms will be handled at this meeting. See the proposal/programme/location grid linked here.

    Undergraduate Meet-up, Brown-Bag (details via email)
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:10 to 5:00 Institute Panel: Perspectives on DH (or, #myDHis ...)
    Jason Boyd (Ryerson U): "At Play in the Digital Humanities." Abstract: This presentation will move from discussion of the Texting Wilde Project and designing playful interfaces for it to a more general reflection on the place of play in DH, informed by work in games studies, gameful design, speculative computing, and queer theory.

    Liz Grumbach (Texas A&M U): "Modding the Academy: eMOP, ARC, and Emerging (Digital) Humanities Paradigms." Abstract: As “research staff” at the Initiative for Digital Humanities, Media, and Culture (IDHMC) at Texas A&M University, my digital humanities is about collaboration, project development, and finding effective methods for facilitating research in an academic field that still privileges traditional humanities research methodologies over emerging forms of scholarly communication and knowledge production. I will briefly describe two interdisciplinary projects run out of the IDHMC (the Early Modern OCR Project and the Advanced Research Consortium) to facilitate further discussion of how emerging digital methodologies can remodel our perceptions of how and where scholarly research is produced.

    Claudia von Vacano (UC Berkeley): "Data Science in the Service of Humanity at Berkeley." Abstract: The Division of Arts and Humanities at Berkeley is building an infrastructure to buttress digital humanities in conversation with data science. This includes critical analysis of a data science initiative. In this short talk, Digital Humanities (DH) at Berkeley Director Claudia von Vacano discusses radical organizational change within a strongly-established institution. Claudia argues that it is incumbent upon us to bring greater diversity to data science thinking in order to prevent data science from becoming a monolithic enterprise across universities. Now more than ever artists and humanists need to ensure that data science is at the service of humanity in its various expressions. Claudia discusses the specific organizational structures at Berkeley that are supporting this ambitious endeavor.

    Amardeep Singh (Lehigh U): "'Harlem Shadows': A Collaborative, Social Justice-Oriented Digital Edition" For a Digital Humanities graduate seminar, I developed an assignment that aimed to introduce students to the basic elements of constructing a digital edition based on a given text (Claude McKay's 1922 collection of poetry, "Harlem Shadows). The project was fully collaborative; fundamental decisions regarding the purpose of the site, the intended audience, and site design were left entirely to students, with research input from faculty. This turned out to be an effective way to get students new to DH oriented in at least one area of the field, while also keeping questions of social justice and representation of minority writers online a central focus.

    Lisa Goddard (U Victoria): “On the Same Page: Models for Library-DH Collaboration.” Abstract: DH researchers increasingly find themselves in need of research supports that extend beyond the services offered in traditional humanities departments. These might include server space, programming expertise, database management, metadata support, and digital preservation services. Libraries need access to faculty and student subject expertise to enrich online collections and exhibits, and to improve discovery and research interfaces. There is an enormous amount of complementarity in our needs and interests, but new approaches are necessary to help us bridge dissimilar governance and funding models. This presentation will draw on our experience at UVic Libraries to propose models that can foster closer collaboration for the mutual benefit of the library and its DH partners.


    Co-Chairs: Constance Crompton (UBC Okanagan) and Matt Huculak (U Victoria)
    (MacLaurin A144)
    5:00 to 6:00 Light Reception (Felicitas, Student Union Building)

    Tuesday, 7 June 2016

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:30
    DHSI Colloquium Session 1 (MacLaurin A144)
  • Chair: TBA
  • Working at the Intersection of Renaissance Studies and DH: An Update on Iter Initiatives. Randa El Khatib (U Victoria); Lindsey Seatter (U Victoria); William Bowen (U Toronto, Scarborough); Daniel Powell (King’s College London); Ray Siemens (U Victoria)
  • The NYU Libraries Web Hosting Pilot: An Update and Lessons Learned. Zach Coble (New York U)
  • Exploring Place in the French of Italy. Heather Hill (Fordham U)
  • Digital Representations of Petrarch’s "Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta". Isabella Magni (Indiana U)
  • Voices of Southern Patagonia. Gustavo Navarro (U Nacional de la Patagonia Austral)
  • Wednesday, 8 June 2016

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:30
    DHSI Colloquium Session 2 (MacLaurin A144)
  • Chair: TBA
  • Transforming Bad OCR into Useful Metadata? Exploring NLP Possibilities. Evan Williamson (U Idaho)
  • Piloting Linked Open Data for Artists' Books at University of California, Irvine. Emilee Mathews (U California, Irvine)
  • Four Words: The Role of Theory in Digital Humanities. Grant Glass (U North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
  • Rethinking the Exhibition Catalogue: Documentation, Curation, and the Digital Humanities Project. Julia Polyck-O'Neill (Brock U); Aleksandra Kaminska (Simon Fraser U)
  • Digital Storytelling for Digital Humanities. John F. Barber (Washington State U, Vancouver)
  • Thursday, 9 June 2016

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    [Instructor lunch meeting]
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 5:00
    DHSI Colloquium Session 3. Special Theme: Gender and the Digital (MacLaurin Building, Room A144)
  • Chair: TBA
  • A Textual Analysis of Female Renaissance Playwrights using R. Elizabeth Ramsay (Trent U)
  • The Comparison of Human-Reading and Machine-Reading in Le Système de la Nature. Maryam Mozafari (Simon Fraser U)
  • Does Gender Affect How Genre-Conformingly Writers Write? Sayan Bhattacharyya (U Illinois, Urbana-Champaign); Ted Underwood (U Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
  • 5:00 to 5:30
    DHSI Colloquium (contd.), Electronic Literature Affiliated Event: Alan Sondheim, "Language, Accident, and the Virtual" (MacLaurin Building, Room A144)

    Abstract: This talk engages concepts of blankness, geography, gamespace in virtual worlds, and what I term edgespace - the limits of the gamespace, where language occurs and seethes. I argue that the phenomenology of the real comes into play when living spaces are abandoned, where broken geographies are signs of a future already present. I present instances of digital language production in such spaces, working through virtual worlds such as Second Life and the Macgrid, as well as self-contained Open Sim software that can be run on most computers.

    The edgespace is always uneasy, tottering, catastrophic; it is the space of the unalloyed digital, where things no longer operate within a classical or modernist tradition. Increasingly, this space characterizes our current place in the world, with its fractured media histories and environments of scorched earth, environmental depredation, and slaughter. We can work through and within such spaces, developing (as perhaps Occupy did) new forms of production, resistance, and digital culture.

    5:30 to ~6:15
    Performance: Vibrant Lives (Jessica Rajko, Eileen Standley, Jacque Wernimont, Stjepan Rajko)
    (Just outside MacLaurin Building, Room A100)


    Critically commenting on this use of personal data, Vibrant Lives is an interactive installation that gives audiences a real-time sense of their own voluminous “data shed” (the data that we share as a part of everyday life). In this, Vibrant Lives troubles boundaries erected by ideas of disembodied, abstracted, “immaterial” metadata and people. By juxtaposing the different ways that we engage with technologies of communication and preservation, we ask our audiences to consider interplays of value, valuation, technology, information, and material/matter. Rather than exploring more traditional audio/visual methods for sharing data information, this work offers haptic (touch-based) feedback to elicit a more visceral understanding of what it means to “shed data.”

    Friday, 10 June 2016 [DHSI; ELO and INKE Opening]

    8:00 to 9:30 Electronic Literature Organization + INKE Registration (MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
    9:00 to Noon DHSI Classes in Session
    10:00 to 10:30 ELO Welcome (MacLaurin Building, Room A144)
    10:30 to Noon ELO Featured Session A
    Noon + Electronic Literature Organization + INKE Registration (MacLaurin Building, Room A100)

    DHSI Lunch Reception / Course E-Exhibits [to 1.00] (MacLaurin A100)
    ELO Lunch Reception and Gallery Opening [to 1.45] (MacLaurin A100)
    1:00 to 1:45
    INKE Welcome (Jon Bath [U Saskatchewan]) and DHSI Week 1 Farewell (Ray Siemens)

    Joint Institute Lecture, INKE and DHSI (ELO participants welcome!)
    Jon Saklofske (Acadia U): “Prototyping Resistance: Wargame Narrative and Inclusive Feminist Discourse.”
    Chair: Diane Jakacki (Bucknell U)
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: Can a feminist war game exist? War, traditionally the sole purview of men, is an essential site for asking critical questions about masculinist systems and mediated representations, especially since subjects, objects and agents are all instruments within the ideological narratives that frame the brutal history of armed conflict. Simply including female “warrior” characters in a war game, for example, continues to normalize the mechanism of war while extending its “inclusiveness” to groups that have traditionally been marginalized and victimized by it. However, prototyping complex intersections between mechanisms of war, digital game narrativities, and inclusive feminist values suggests that feminist discourses can be used to denaturalize and reframe narratives of war in spaces of programmed play.

    1:45 to 3:00
    Joint Panel, ELO, INKE, and DHSI: “Prototyping Resistance: Wargame Narrative and Inclusive Feminist Discourse”
    Panel Discussants: Stephanie Boluk (Pratt Institute), Diane Jakacki (Bucknell U), Elizabeth Losh (UC San Diego), Jon Saklofske (Acadia U), and Anastasia Salter (U Central Florida)
    Co-Chairs: Dene Grigar (Washington State U, Vancouver), Jon Bath (U Saskatchewan), Ray Siemens (U Victoria)
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract (from the earlier talk): Can a feminist war game exist? War, traditionally the sole purview of men, is an essential site for asking critical questions about masculinist systems and mediated representations, especially since subjects, objects and agents are all instruments within the ideological narratives that frame the brutal history of armed conflict. Simply including female “warrior” characters in a war game, for example, continues to normalize the mechanism of war while extending its “inclusiveness” to groups that have traditionally been marginalized and victimized by it. However, prototyping complex intersections between mechanisms of war, digital game narrativities, and inclusive feminist values suggests that feminist discourses can be used to denaturalize and reframe narratives of war in spaces of programmed play.

    3:15 to 4:45 ELO Concurrent Session 1: 1.1 Best Practices for Archiving E-Lit; 1.2 Medium & Meaning; 1.3 A Critical Look at E-Lit; 1.4 Literary Games; 1.5 eLit and the (Next) Future of Cinema; 1.6 Authors & Texts
    ELO Action Session 1
    5:00 to 6:00 (maybe even starting a few minutes earlier ....)
    Joint Reception: ELO, INKE, and DHSI (University Club)
    Informal launch for / celebration of the DHSI community collection, Doing Digital Humanities (Routledge 2016)
    DHSI Colloquium Poster Session
    INKE Gathering Poster Session
    ELO New Scholars Poster Session

    DHSI Colloquium Poster Session Presenters:
  • Practicums in the Digital Humanities: Four KPU Case Studies. Greg Chan (Kwanten Polytechnic U) and ENGL 4300 Students (TBD)
  • The HathiTrust Research Center: Supporting Large Scale Analysis of the HathiTrust Digital Library. Sayan Bhattacharyya (U Illinois); Nicholae Cline (Indiana U); Eleanor Dickson (U Illinois); Leanne Mobley (Indiana U)
  • Digital Scholarship in the Institutional Repository. Jeri Wieringa (George Mason U)
  • Canada's Early Women Writers and All Their Relatives. Karyn Huenemann (Simon Fraser U)
  • Darwin's Semantic Voyage. Jaimie Murdock (Indiana U); Colin Allen (Indiana U); Simon DeDeo (Indiana U)
  • Possible Spanish Idiom In A Name At Nootka. Paula Johanson (U Victoria)


    INKE Poster Session Presenter:
  • Genre-based Approaches to Domain Modeling: A Case Study Involving Rulebooks. Kelly Colht (Information School, U Washington)


  • ELO Poster Session Presenters:
  • Social Media for E-Lit Authors. Michael Rabby (Washington State U Vancouver)
  • – O True Apothecary! Kyle Booten (UC Berkeley, Center for New Media)
  • Electronic Literature Production – A Case Study of Korporacja Ha!art. Aleksandra Malecka (Jagiellonian U); Piotr Marecki (Jagiellonian U)
  • How to Upset the Contributors? The Responses of Collaborating Readers to the Publication of Crowdsourced Literature. Heiko Zimmermann (U Trier)
  • Life Experience through Digital Simulation Narratives. David Núñez Ruiz (Neotipo)
  • Building Stories. Kate Palermini (Washington State U Vancouver)
  • Help Wanted and Skills Offered. by Deena Larsen (Independent Artist); Julianne Chatelain (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation)
  • Beyond Original E-Lit: Deconstructing Austen Cybertexts. Meredith Dabek (Maynooth U)
  • Arabic E-Lit (AEL) Project. Riham Hosny (Rochester Institute of Technology / Minia U)
  • 7:30 to 9:00 ELO Readings and Performances (Felicitas, Student Union Building)

    Saturday, 11 June 2016 [ELO + INKE + Suggested Outings!]

    8:00 to Noon Electronic Literature Organization + INKE Registration (MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
    8:30 to 10:00 ELO Lightning Round
    ELO Gallery Exhibit Opens (10:00)
    INKE Session 1: Visualization
    10:30 to Noon ELO Concurrent Session 2: 2.1 Literary Interventions; 2.2 E-Lit in Global Contexts; 2.3 Theoretical Underpinnings; 2.4 E-Lit in Time and Space; 2.5 Understanding Bots
    ELO Action Session 2
    INKE Session 2: Modelling Theory, Prototyping Practice
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch
    ELO Artists' Talks
    1:30 to 3:00 ELO Concurrent Session 3: 3.1 E-Lit Pedagogy in Global Setting; 3.2 The Art of Computational Media; 3.3 Present Future Past; 3.4 Beyond Collaborative Horizons; 3.5 E-Loops, Reshuffling Reading And Writing In Electronic Literature Works; 3.6 Metaphorical Perspectives; 3.7 Embracing Bots
    ELO Workshops (to 3.30)
    INKE Session 3: Production, Process, Product
    3:30 to 5:00 ELO Keynote: Christine Wilks, “Interactive Narrative and the Art of Steering Through Possible Worlds” (MacLaurin Building, Room A144)
    INKE Session 4: Environments, Users, Experiences
    5:15 to 6:45 ELO Screenings (Cinecenta)
    7:00 to 9:00 (With optional cocktails earlier) ELO Informal Banquet and Dance (University Club)
    (INKE participants are invited to hang out with our ELO pals, too!)
    All day
    Suggested Outings
    Some ideas, for those who'd like to explore the area!
    Suggested Outing 1, Botanical Beach (self-organised; car needed)
    A self-guided visit to the wet, wild west coast tidal shelf (and historically-significant former research site) at Botanical Beach; we recommend departing early (around 8.00 am) to catch low tide for a better view of the wonderful undersea life! Consider bringing a packed lunch to nibble-on while looking at the crashing waves when there, and then have an afternoon drink enjoying the view from the deck of the Port Renfrew Hotel.

    Suggested Outing 2, Butchart Gardens (self-organised)
    A shorter journey to the resplendently beautiful Butchart Gardens and, if you like, followed by (ahem) a few minutes at the nearby Church and State Winery, in the Saanich Penninsula. About an hour there by public bus from UVic, or 30 minutes by car.

    Suggested Outing 3, Saltspring Island (self-organised; a full day, car/bus + ferry combo)
    Why not take a day to explore and celebrate the funky, laid back, Canadian gulf island lifestyle on Saltspring Island. Ferry departs regularly from the Schwartz Bay ferry terminal, which is about one hour by bus / 30 minutes by car from UVic. You may decide to stay on forever ....

    Suggested Outing 4, Paddling Victoria's Inner Harbour (self-organised)
    A shorter time, seeing Victoria's beautiful city centre from the waterways that initially inspired its foundation. A great choice is the day is sunny and warm. Canoes, kayaks, and paddle boards are readily rented from Ocean River Adventures and conveniently launched from right behind the store. Very chill.

    And more!
    Self-organised High Tea at the Empress Hotel, scooter rentals, visit to the Royal BC Museum, darts at Christies Carriage House, a hangry breakfast at a local diner, whale watching, kayaking, brew pub sampling (at Spinnaker's, Swans, Moon Under Water, and beyond!), paddle-boarding, a tour of used bookstores,and more have also been suggested!

    Sunday, 12 June 2016 [DHSI; ELO + DHSI Registration, Workshops]

    8:30 to 10:00 ELO Town Hall Meeting
    ELO Gallery Exhibit Opens (10:00)
    10:30 to Noon ELO Concurrent Session 4: 4.1 Narratives and Narrativity; 4.2 Historical & Critical Perspectives; 4.3 Emergent Media; 4.4 Narrative and Poetic Experiences; 4.5 The E-Literary Object; 4.6 Next Narrative
    ELO Action Session 3
    12:15 to 1:30 Lunch
    ELO Artists' Talks
    12.30 to 5:00 DHSI Registration (NEW LOCATION: MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
    After registration, many will wander to Cadboro Bay and the pub at Smuggler's Cove OR the other direction to Shelbourne Plaza and Maude Hunter's Pub.
    1:00 to 4:00 DHSI 3-hour Workshops
    - 47. Crowdsourcing as a Tool for Research and Public Engagement [12 June] (David Strong C114, Classroom)
    - 48. Text Analysis with the HathiTrust Research Center [12 June] (Cornett B129, Classroom)
    - 49. Dynamics of Explanatory Annotation [12 June] (Clearihue D131, Classroom)
    - 50. Dynamic Ontologies for the Humanities [12 June] (Cornett A128, Classroom)
    - 51. Digital Preservation Basics for DH [12 June] (McPherson Library 129, Classroom)
    - 52. Understanding Digital Video [12 June] (Human and Social Development A270, Classroom)
    - 53. DHSI Knits, or, In The Loop [12 June] (Cornett A229, Classroom)
    1:30 to 3:00 ELO Concurrent Session 5: 5.1 Subversive Texts; 5.2 Experiments in #NetProv & Participatory Narratives; 5.3 Emergent Media; 5.4 E-Lit Labs; 5.5 Transmedia Publishing; 5.6 Feminist Horizons
    3:30 to 5:30 ELO Closing Session, Stories & Their Platforms
    7:30 to 9:00 ELO Special Event in honor of Canadian Artist Randy Adams
    (Limbic Media Gallery: #2 740 Discovery Street; 778.430.5123)

    Monday, 13 June 2016

    Your hosts for the week are Alyssa Arbuckle, Ray Siemens and Dan Sondheim.
    8:15 to 8:45 DHSI Last-minute Registration (MacLaurin Building, Room A100)
    9:00 to 10:00 Welcome, Orientation, and Instructor Overview (MacLaurin A144)
    10:15 to Noon
    Classes in Session (click for details and locations)
  • 22. [Foundations] Introduction to Computation for Literary Criticism (MacLaurin D010, Classroom)
  • 23. [Foundations] Web Development / Project Prototyping with Ruby on Rails (Clearihue A010, Lab)
  • 24. [Foundations] Models for DH at Liberal Arts Colleges (& 4 Yr Institutions) (Hickman 120, Classroom)
  • 25. Wrangling Big Data for DH (Clearihue A015, Lab)
  • 26. Conceptualising and Creating a Digital Edition (McPherson Library A003, Classroom)
  • 27. Stylometry with R: Computer-Assisted Analysis of Literary Texts (Business and Economics 180, Lab)
  • 28. R, Interactive Graphics, and Data Visualization for the Humanities (Human and Social Development A160, Lab)
  • 29. Online Collaborative Scholarship: Principles and Practices (A CWRCShop) (Human and Social Development A264, Classroom)
  • 30. Sounds and Digital Humanities (MacLaurin D111, Classroom)
  • 31. Accessibility & Digital Environments (David Strong C108, Classroom)
  • 32. Critical Pedagogy and Digital Praxis in the Humanities (MacLaurin D109, Classroom)
  • 33. Text Mapping as Modelling (Clearihue A311, Classroom)
  • 34. Building a Professional Identity and Skillset in the Digital Humanities (Cornett A128, Classroom)
  • 35. Digital Humanities with a Global Outlook (Cornett A229, Classroom)
  • 36. Physical Computing and Desktop Fabrication (MacLaurin D016, Classroom)
  • 37. XML Applications and Databases for Historical and Literary Research (Clearihue D132, Classroom)
  • 38. Games for Digital Humanists (David Strong C114, Classroom); M PM and Tu PM in (Human and Social Development A170, Lab)
  • 39. Understanding Topic Modeling (MacLaurin D105, Classroom)
  • 40. Feminist Digital Humanities: Theoretical, Social, and Material Engagements (MacLaurin D107, Classroom)
  • 42. Advanced Criticism and Engagement of Electronic Literature (MacLaurin D115, Classroom)
  • 43. Advanced TEI Concepts / TEI Customisation (MacLaurin D114, Classroom)


  • 12:15 to 1:15
    Lunch break / Unconference Coordination Session (MacLaurin A144)
    (Grab a sandwich and come on down!)

    Unconference discussions through DHSI are coordinated by Paige Morgan, Yvonne Lam, and Randa El Khatib; discussion topics, scheduling, and room assignments from among all DHSI rooms will be handled at this meeting. See the proposal/programme/location grid linked here.
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:10 to 5:00
    Institute Lecture
    Laura Estill (Texas A&M): "Digital Futures: Long-term Planning for your Project"
    Chair: TBA
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: The start of every digital project is as exhilarating as it is overwhelming. But when should you start looking ahead to the end? And does there have to be an end? As Robin Camille Davis reports, 45% of projects discussed at DH '05 are no longer available online. In this talk, I'd like to offer some best practices for thinking about your DH project in the long term, from workflow and technologies to people and resources. I will share my experience taking on a long-standing existing digital project (The World Shakespeare Bibliography Online). Although thinking about documentation and archiving might strike terror in your hearts, or make your eyelids droop with boredom, ultimately, having a well-thought-out plan leads to serenity and peace of mind (or at least leaves you free to worry about other important things, like how you're not flossing enough).

    5:00 to 6:00 Light Reception
    (Felicitas, Student Union Building)

    Tuesday, 14 June 2016

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    DHBox information session (MacLaurin A144)
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 6:00
    DHSI Colloquium Session 4. Special Theme: Building an Inclusive DH Community (MacLaurin A144)
  • Chair: TBA
  • Working in the Digital Humanities - An Exploration of Scholarly Practices for Early-career Academics. Steve Anderson (U California, Riverside); Matt Bouchard (U Toronto); Andy Keenan (U Toronto); Lee Zickel (Case Western Reserve U)
  • DH Internships: Building Digital Humanities Capacity with Care at Emory. Alan G. Pike (Emory U)
  • Mapping German POWs in the Soviet Gulag, 1941-1956. Susan Grunewald (Carnegie Mellon U)
  • Undergraduate Contributorship Models with TaDiRAH. Aaron Mauro (Penn State, Behrend)
  • The Anti-MOOC: An Online Small Seminar Format for Distance Mentoring and Digital Public History Projects. Cathy Kroll (Sonoma State U)
  • Wednesday, 15 June 2016

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    ILiADS: Institute for Liberal Arts Digital Scholarship information session (MacLaurin D101)
    [Instructor lunch meeting]
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 6:00
    DHSI Colloquium Session 5 (MacLaurin A144)
  • Chair: TBA
  • Sounds and Digital Humanities. John F. Barber (Washington State U, Vancouver)
  • Mapping a Digital History of Big Science. Elyse Graham (SUNY, Stony Brook)
  • Mapping a Global Renaissance with 53,829 Texts. James Lee (Grinnel College)
  • Digitization and Dissemination of Movable Books Data. Emily Brooks (U Florida)
  • Diversity in Aesthetic Categories: Using Biblical Translation to Examine Word Sense and Popular Belief. Zach Bleemer (U California, Berkeley)
  • Thursday, 16 June 2016

    9:00 to Noon DHSI Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch break / Unconference
    1:30 to 4:00 Classes in Session
    4:15 to 6:00
    DHSI Colloquium Session 6 (MacLaurin A144)
  • Chair: TBA
  • Using DH to Increase Legal Literacy and Agency. Susan Tanner (Carnegie Mellon U)
  • Detecting Text Reuse in Nineteenth-Century Legal Codes of Civil Procedure. Lincoln Mullen (George Mason U); Kellen Funk (Princeton U)
  • ABC's of Gamification: How we Gamified a Social Media Course. Rob Bajko (Ryerson U), Jaigris Hodson (Royal Roads U)
  • Collection, Curation, and Collaboration: Representing Canadian Gay Liberationists. Nadine Boulay (Simon Fraser U); Anderson Tuguinay (Ryerson U); Stefanie Martin (Ryerson U); Seamus Riordan-Short (U British Columbia, Okanagan); Raymon Sandhu (U British Columbia, Okanagan)
  • Privacy, Legality, and Feminism: How Do We Build a Feminist Politics into Open Access Data Structures? Emily Christina Murphy (Queen’s U)
  • Recreating the Fiction Factory: The James Malcolm Rymer Collection. Rebecca Nesvet (U Wisconsin, Green Bay)
  • Digital History and Archiving: Fostering the “Afterlife” and Accessibility of American Civil War Letters. Ashley Hughes (Texas Christian U)
  • Friday, 17 June 2016

    9:00 to Noon Classes in Session
    12:15 to 1:15 Lunch Reception / Course E-Exhibits (MacLaurin A100)
    1:30 to 2:45 Awards and Bursaries Recognition
    Institute Lecture
    James Cummings (Oxford U): “Grass Roots and Ivory Towers: Building communities and inspiring participation in the Digital Humanities”
    Chair: TBA
    (MacLaurin A144)

    Abstract: The various fields and organisations in the big tent of Digital Humanities all approach community involvement in different ways. Outside traditional academic teaching, much of the work is done by communities which thrive partly as a result of in-kind commitments and volunteer labour, often donated in evenings and weekends by those striving to make their particular endeavour a success. By re-examining a number of the DH communities I have been involved with, I hope to trace some of their successes, failures, risks, and the necessary fragilities of their development and undertakings. This re-examination will encompass a range of community projects from entirely grass roots and mostly finance-free endeavours such as the open DH Awards (http://dhawards.org) and Digital Medievalist (http://digitalmedievalist.org) project through to self-funding break-even institutional activities such as DHOxSS (http://digital.humanities.ox.ac.uk/dhoxss/) and membership consortia such as the TEI Consortium (http://www.tei-c.org/). Each of these projects employs different strategies to ensure that their work relates to their communities and engages the public, with some methods proving more successful than others in eliciting help or volunteer labour from these communities. By investigating these methods, I hope to tease out the more successful strategies and to discuss how these might be employed by those setting up new DH initiatives.

    2:45 to 3:00 Closing, DHSI in Review (MacLaurin A144)

    Contact info:
    institut@uvic.ca P: 250-472-5401 F: 250-472-5681